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Showing posts from January, 2019

Korean Mummy Stories in National Geographic Reading Explorer

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National Geographic Reading Explorer is the best-selling six-level Reading Explorer series that bring the world to the classroom like never before through new and updated topics, video, and visuals from National Geographic.

My study on Korean mummy will appear in the next edition of National Geographic Reading Explorer....




Our study reported in BBC, CNN and Times of India

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Our study on the skeletons found at Rakhigarhi cemetery of Indus Valley Civilization was reported by BBC, CNN and Times of India.

The Harappan Civilization, one of the earliest complex societies in the world, flourished on the Indian subcontinent. Although many additional Harappan settlements and cemeteries have been discovered and investigated, no coupled burials at Harappan cemeteries have been reported to date. In 2013–2016, we excavated the cemetery of the Rakhigarhi site (Haryana), the largest city of the Harappan Civilization. At the site, we found a grave that turned out to be a coupled (joint) burial of the primary type. This report is the first anthropologically confirmed case of coupled burial from a Harappan cemetery.


The details were already published in A young couple's grave found in the Rakhigarhi cemetery of the Harappan Civilization

Please see the links:

BBC NEWS: Harappa grave of ancient 'couple' reveals secrets

CNN: Ancient lovers found in Indian burial s…

[Publication] Medieval mummies of Zeleny Yar burial ground in the Arctic Zone of Western Siberia

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We published "Medieval mummies of Zeleny Yar burial ground in the Arctic Zone of Western Siberia" in PLOS ONE.


Notwithstanding the pioneering achievements of studies on arctic mummies in Siberia, there are insufficient data for any comprehensive understanding of the bio-cultural details of medieval people living in the region. In the Western Siberian arctic, permafrost mummies have been found in 12th to 13th century graves located in the Zeleny Yar (Z-Y) burial ground (66°19'4.54"С; 67°21'13.54"В). In 2013–2016, we were fortunate to be able to excavate that cemetery, locating a total of 47 burials, including cases of mummification. Some of these mummies had been wrapped in a multi-layered birch-bark cocoon. After removal of the cocoon, we conducted interdisciplinary studies using various scientific techniques. Gross anatomical examination and CT radiography showed that the internal organs were still well preserved inside the body cavities. Under light and …

[Publication] The Buchta-Nakhodka 2 burial ground: Results of archaeoparasitological and macro-remains investigations of samples from the burial grounds of the 6th–13th century CE on the Yamal Peninsula in Russia

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We joined in the study on "The Buchta-Nakhodka 2 burial ground: Results of archaeoparasitological and macro-remains investigations of samples from the burial grounds of the 6th–13th century CE on the Yamal Peninsula in Russia", with Dr. Sergey Slepchenko (Tyumen Scientific Centre of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tyumen, Russian Federation)



Buchta Nakhodka 2 is the oldest and most northern burial ground in the territory of Western Siberia. Examination of samples from the anterior aspect of the sacrum and sacral foramina revealed helminth eggs of Diphyllobothrium sp. This discovery proves the existence of intestinal parasites among members of the medieval Buchta-Nakhodka populations who consumed uncooked or slightly-salt-treated fish. The high rate of Diphyllobothriasis that appeared in a present-day population of native peoples inhabiting the same area in the far north of Western Siberia points to a continuation of the dietary habits of the medieval pop…

[Study in Russia] Collaboration with Dr. Sergey Slepchenko

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It is the fourth year of researches in collaboration with Institute of the problems of Northern development, Scientific Centre of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences
This year we visited Tyumen City to investigate mummies and skeletons discovered in the Russian Arctic area. 
In my lab, two PhD candidate researchers, Hong JH and Lee HJ, and myself participated in the investigation. 
I wish I could make much successes in this collaborative investigation on invaluable subjects in Arctic region, with Dr. Sergey Slepchenko in IPND.






[Publication] Dental Caries and Antemortem Tooth loss observed in Native peoples and Russian settlers of 16th to 19th century Western Siberia

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Our paper, "Dental Caries and Antemortem Tooth loss observed in Native peoples and Russian settlers of 16th to 19th century Western Siberia" is published in Archives of Oral Biology.

Objective
Increased prevalence of dental caries evidently is correlated with increasing intake of sugar and carbohydrate-rich foods. Preceding and accompanying this dietary alteration might have been a shift from a hunting-and-gathering subsistence strategy to one based on agriculture. We corroborated this conjecture by means of a study on the prevalence of caries, antemortem tooth loss (AMTL) and tooth wear among 16th to 19th century hunter-gatherers and agriculturalists who co-existed in West Siberia.

Design
Indigenous skeletons (n = 75) exhumed from Tatar, Selkup, Khant, and Nenet graves along with Russian settler skeletons (n = 79) from Izyuk were examined. The prevalence of caries, AMTL and tooth wear among the indigenous peoples were compared with those among the Russian settlers. The res…

[Publication] Traumatic injury in the Harappan people’s skull found at Rakhigarhi cemetery

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Our paper, "Traumatic injury in a cranium found at Rakhigarhi cemetery of Harappan civilization as anthropological evidence of interpersonal violence" is published in Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports. 
The Harappan Civilization is notable as one of the earliest complex societies spanning the vast area of northwest India and Pakistan. To uncover patterns of violent injury among the Harappan people, anthropologists have looked for signs of trauma on skeletons. Notwithstanding the pioneering achievements made thus far, there is still more work to do before violence among the Harappan people will be comprehensively understood from the socio-cultural perspective. In this study, we report new evidence of violence-related trauma found among remains unearthed from the Mature Harappan period (2600–1900 BCE) cemetery of Rakhigarhi, located about 150 km northwest of Delhi. Briefly, in the left frontal area of the cranium of an adult female (BR12), we found a depression fract…