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Showing posts from October, 2018

[Session Chair and Presentation] The 8th Asia Pacific International Congress of Anatomists (APICA)

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We organized physical anthropology session for The 8th Asia Pacific International Congress of Anatomists (APICA) (Busan, October 28-31, 2018).



Session Title: Physical Anthropology
Day 2, Oct. 29, 2018 

Organizers: 
Dong Hoon Shin (Seoul National University, South Korea)
Myeung Ju Kim (Dankook University, South Korea)

Schedule: 
13:30-13:55 mtDNA haplogroup in ancient human DNA samples by Kyung Yong Kim (Chung-Ang Uversity, Korea)

13:55-14:15 Caries, antemortem tooth loss and tooth wear observed in indigenous peoples and Russian settlers of  16th to 19th century West Siberia by Hye Jin Lee (Ministry of National Defense Agency KIA Recovery & Identification, Korea)

14:15-14:30 Parasite aDNA of Korean mummies by Jong Ha Hong (Seoul National University, Korea)

14:30-14:45 Famine and Stress Markers, with a Focus on Enamel Hypoplasia by Shiori Fujisawa (Aomori Chuo Gakuin University, Japan)

14:45-15:10 Arctic mummies in Salekhard by Dong Hoon Shin (Seoul National University, Korea)

[Publication] Anatomical Confirmation of the Joseon Mummy's Hearts Visible on Computed Tomography Images: The Radiological Basis of Paleo-Cardiology

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Our paper, "Anatomical Confirmation of the Joseon Mummy's Hearts Visible on Computed Tomography Images: The Radiological Basis of Paleo-Cardiology" is newly accepted by Anthropologischer Anzeiger.


Accurate interpretation of radiological data is important for reliable paleopathological study of mummies. This is especially true for the mummified heart, an anatomically complicated organ that is distorted and displaced due to long-term dehydration and the action of gravity. In the present study, we compared post-factum autopsy results for mummified hearts of differing preservation statuses with corresponding radiological (computed tomography [CT]-image) findings in order to obtain information necessary for accurate radiological diagnosis. We found that the valvular apparatus (especially the aortic valve and chordae tendinae) was easily distinguishable on the CT images of mummies in which more cardiac structures were preserved. We also identified several situations that are …

[Publication] A young couple's grave found in the Rakhigarhi cemetery of the Harappan Civilization

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Our paper on "A young couple's grave found in the Rakhigarhi cemetery of the Harappan Civilization" was published in Anatomy and Cell Biology.

The Harappan Civilization, one of the earliest complex societies in the world, flourished on the Indian subcontinent. Although many additional Harappan settlements and cemeteries have been discovered and investigated, no coupled burials at Harappan cemeteries have been reported to date. In 2013–2016, we excavated the cemetery of the Rakhigarhi site (Haryana), the largest city of the Harappan Civilization. At the site, we found a grave that turned out to be a coupled (joint) burial of the primary type. This report is the first anthropologically confirmed case of coupled burial from a Harappan cemetery.