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Showing posts from January, 2018

[Publication] Mitochondrial DNA analysis of Bos taurus bone collected from ruins of the Joseon Period in a tributary of the Cheonggyecheon creek, South Korea

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Our article, "Mitochondrial DNA analysis of Bos taurus bone collected from ruins of the Joseon Period in a tributary of the Cheonggyecheon creek, South Korea" is published in Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports



Although genetic information about Bos taurus has been successfully revealed by a number of studies, the data on ancient DNA remains insufficient with respect to cattle raised in East Asia during historical times. This is especially so in the case of South Korea, where very little genetic information on cattle DNA has been obtained, notwithstanding the significant changes in the genetic traits of cattle populations that occurred during the country's colonial period. In the present study, we have endeavored to determine the mitochondrial DNA D-loop and coding region sequences obtained from a 15th century cattle bone unearthed amid an archaeological site of the Joseon-period in a tributary of the Cheonggyecheon creek, South Korea. The consensus sequence of t…

[Publication] Horse-riding accidents and injuries in historical records of Joseon Dynasty, Korea

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Our paper, "Horse-riding accidents and injuries in historical records of Joseon Dynasty, Korea" is published in International Journal of Paleopathology


Only a few osteological reports describe bone injuries thought to have been caused by falls from horses. Nevertheless, anthropological study alone is insufficient for establishing the correlates of such equestrian accidents. We therefore reviewed the records in Seungjeongwon ilgi (Diaries of the Royal Secretariat) and Joseon wangjo silrok (Annals of the Joseon Dynasty) of the Korea’s Joseon period (1392–1910 CE). Although the mechanisms of trauma were diverse, the Joseon documents recorded many injuries caused by horse-riding accidents. During 1625–1872 CE, equestrian-related accidents occurred almost every year, overwhelming other causes of trauma. In all horse-riding accidents (n = 142), 37.77% of the records offer detailed data about the traumatic mechanism. Injuries occurred most frequently to the extremities (79.58%), w…

[Lecture] Introduction to Bioinformatics for the Researches of Anatomy and Cell Biology

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Introduction to Bioinformatics for the Researchesof Anatomy and Cell Biology
Time: 6 to 9 pm, Wednesday Venue: Room 212 (Meeting Room), Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology Professor: Dong Hoon Shin (02-740-8203)

Week Date Lecture Contents Professor 1 3/7 Orientation Dong Hoon Shin 2 3/14 BLAST (1) Dong Hoon Shin 3 3/21 BLAST (2) Dong Hoon Shin 4 3/28 BLAST (3) Dong Hoon Shin 5 4/4 BLAST (4) Dong Hoon Shin 6 4/11 MEGA (1) Dong Hoon Shin 7 4/18 MEGA (2) Dong Hoon Shin 8 4/25 Mid-term exam Dong Hoon Shin 9 5/2 Special lecture To be determined 10 5/9 The basis of Biopython Dong Hoon Shin 11 5/16 Phylogenetic Network (1) Dong Hoon Shin 12 5/23 Phylogenetic Network (2) Dong Hoon Shin 13 5/30 Bayesian inference in phylogeny (1) Dong Hoon Shin 14 6/20 Bayesian inference in phylogeny (2) Dong Hoon Shin 15 6/27

[Publication] The presence of sharp-edged weapon related cut mark in Joseon skull discovered at the 16th century market district of Old Seoul City ruins in South Korea

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Our paper "The presence of sharp-edged weapon related cut mark in Joseon skull discovered at the 16th century market district of Old Seoul City ruins in South Korea" is finally published in Anatomy and Cell Biology-.


A human skull was discovered at the 16th-century drainage channel of market district ruins, one of the busiest streets in the capital of Joseon kingdom. By anthropological examination, we noticed the cut mark at the right occipital part of the cranium. Judging from the wound property, it might have been caused by a strong strike using a sharp-edged weapon. As no periosteal reaction or healing signs were observed at the cut mark, he might have died shortly after the skull wound was made. We speculated that this might have been of a civilian or soldier victim who died in a battle or the decapitated head of prisoner. This is the first report about the discovery of the skull damaged by sharp-edged weapon at the archaeological sites in the capital city of Joseon Kin…

[Publication] Helicobacter pylori DNA obtained from the stomach specimens of two 17th century Korean mummies

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Our paper "Helicobacter pylori DNA obtained from the stomach specimens of two 17th century Korean mummies" is finally published in Anthropologischer Anzeiger.


Abstract
Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium that grows in the stomach mucosal epithelium, and can induce gastric diseases. Although many studies on modern H. pylori genomes have been reported from all over the world, a comprehensive picture of H. pylori is still lacking. Therefore, there is a pressing need to obtain archaeological specimens and to subject the ancient DNA (aDNA) extracted therefrom to analysis. Considering the typically excellent state of preservation of Joseon mummies discovered in Korea, we thus tried to isolate ancient H. pylori DNA from their mummified stomach specimens. After screening Korean mummy stomachs containing remnant H. pylori DNA, vacA (s- and m-region) alleles were successfully identified in the stomach isolates of two samples. The H. pylori strains identified had vacA s1/m2 (Cheongdo m…

[Publication] Ancient Soil-Transmitted Parasite Eggs Detected from the Sixth Century Three Kingdom Period Silla Tomb

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Our new paper "Ancient Soil-Transmitted Parasite Eggs Detected from the Sixth Century Three Kingdom Period Silla Tomb" is published in Journal of Korean Medical Sciences.


The parasitic infection patterns of the Joseon period have begun to be revealed in a series of paleoparasitological studies. However, parasitism prevailing during or before the Three Kingdom period is still relatively unexplored. In the present study, we therefore conducted parasitological examinations of soil and organic-material sediments precipitated upon human hipbone and sacrum discovered inside an ancient Mokgwakmyo tomb dating to the Silla Dynasty (57 BCE–660 CE). Within the samples, we discovered ancient Ascaris lumbricoides (eggs per gram [EPG], 46.6–48.3) and Trichuris trichiura (EPG, 32.8–62.1) eggs, the species commonly detected among Korean populations until just prior to the 1970s. These findings show that soil-transmitted parasitic infection among the Silla nobility might not have been uncom…

New Executive Members of Korean Academy of Paleopathology and Osteoarchaeology

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Korean Academy of Paleopathology and Osteoarchaeology (KAPO) politely notify that new executive committee members are elected on December, 2017. The term of new committee is 2018-2020. Newly elected directors are Dong Hoon Shin (Seoul National University, cuteminjae@gmail.com) for president, Soong Deok Lee (Seoul National University, sdlee@snu.ac.kr) for vice-president, Sunyoung Pak (Seoul National University, suny@snu.ac.kr) for auditor and Eun Jin Woo (Sejong University, redqin@naver.com) for secretary. KAPO was founded in 2012, having played an important role in exchanging opinions among paleopathologists, holding regular academic meetings, and making advice or proposal on government policies concerning paleopathological or bioanthropological researches in South Korea. With the launch of the new executive committee, KAPO hopes to do active collaboration with paleopathologists from all over the world.

Detail is available in https://paleopathology-association.wildapricot.org/news