Presentations: Annual Meeting of Korean Anatomists


67th Annual Meeting for Korean Anatomists:

Two research outcomes are presented in Annual meeting of Korean anatomists-.
Oct 18-20, 2017.
Pusan, South Korea
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Genetic study of ancient Trichuris trichiura eggs in Joseon Dynasty specimens

Jong Ha Hong1, Chang Seok Oh1,2, Min Seo3,*, Dong Hoon Shin1,2,*

1Laboratory of Bioanthropology, Paleopathology and History of Diseases, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; 2Institute of Forensic Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; 3Department of Parasitology, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan, South Korea; *Co-correspondences.

We analyzed Trichuris trichiura (T. trichiura) ancient DNA (aDNA) extracted from the feces or precipitates of 15th to 18th century Korean mummies. After multiple T. trichiura genes in ancient samples were successfully amplified by PCR, consensus sequences were determined by the alignment of individual clone sequences. The obtained sequences of each gene were well matched with those of T. trichiura reported this far, but can be clearly differentiated from those of other Trichuris species. This can be further confirmed by phylogenetic tree though T. trichiura aDNA sequences were not clustered by their regions. To improve our knowledge in much detail about T. trichiura evolution, more ancient T. trichiura gene sequences should be obtained from the regions of much wider geo-historical scope. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (no. NRF-2016R1A2B4015669).
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Ancient Helicobacter pylori DNA found in Joseon mummy specimens

Chang Seok Oh1, Jong Ha Hong1, Hyejin Lee1,2, Soong Deok Lee3,4, Eunju Lee5,*, Dong Hoon Shin1,4,*

1Laboratory of Bioanthropology, Paleopathology and History of Diseases, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; 2Ministry of National Defense Agency KIA Recovery & Identification, Seoul, Korea; 3Department of Forensic Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; 4Institute of Forensic Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; 5Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, Seoul, Korea; *Co-correspondence

Genetic study on Helicobacter pylori is of scientific interest because they can provide information about the history of human migration. However, there have been only a few studies of ancient H. pylori detection in the world, and furthermore, there was no report that this microorganism was detected in archeological samples in Asian countries including Korea. Considering that all of ancient H. pylori studies have been conducted in archaeological samples like mummies with soft tissues, the possibility of finding H. pylori be high if we analyze the well-preserved Joseon mummies. In this regard, we performed ancient DNA analyses to find the gene sequence of H. pylori, and succeeded in confirming the infection of H. pylori in two Joseon mummies by PCR and sequencing analyses. This study was the first case of ancient H. pylori infection found in ancient Asian people until now. Our discovery is expected to provide crucial information to study the history of H. pylori infection in Koreans and the migration route of Asians. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (2013R1A1A2009688).

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