Papers presented in WAC8, Kyoto

For abstracts were submitted to World Archaeology Congress-8 (Aug 28-Aug 2, Kyoto).

Major author' name is bold-typed; Presenter's name is underlined.  

Radiological Techniques for an Effective Paleopathological Studies in South Korea

Hyejin Lee, Dong Su Yoo, Chang Seok Oh, Jong Ha Hong, Dong Hoon Shin

Bioanthropology and Paleopathology Lab, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
Ministry of National Defense Agency KIA Recovery & Identification, Seoul, South Korea
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Dankook University College of Medicine, Chonan, South Korea

Over the past several years, to obtain the clues for more comprehensive understanding of the biological aspects of pre-modern Korean people in history, radiological technique has been applied to the ancient human remains obtained from the archaeological sites in the country. In fact, though radiology becomes well-established technique for a correct diagnosis of pathological signs still remained in ancient human samples, it has not been proved authentic even by for now, due to insufficient data accumulated for the correct interpretation of the results. To overcome this technical limitation, the radiological data of the pre-modern human samples from South Korea have been analyzed herewith, showing invaluable information that could be used helpfully for improving the accuracy of our future X-ray or CT readings on them. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2013R1A1A2009688).
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Harappan Burial Sites in India: Recent Research Trends

Dong Hoon Shin, Astha Dibyopama, Vasant Shinde, and Nilesh P. Jadhav

1Department of Archaeology, Deccan College Post Graduate and Research Institute, India
2Institute of Forensic Science, Seoul National University, Korea

Harappan civilization flourished mainly in northwestern province of Indian subcontinent, roughly between 4000 to 1500 BCE. There are about more than fifty burial sites of the Harappa Civilization discovered so far. Among them, Lothal, Kalibangan, Rupar, Rakhigarhi, Farmana etc. are major sites yielding the remains of Harappan burial. Until the early 1980’s, the study of human skeletons was primarily focused to answer specific questions pertaining to establishing the ethnic or racial identity of the concerned population. Recently, however, more efforts are made to study the diet, health and DNA of Harappan population, assuming a new aspect of research trends on this. The aim of present paper is to show how the scientific methods applied to Harappan burials are used for the complete reconstruction of Harappan civilization and its people. Queries about this poster might be sent to A. Dibyopama(astha2sep@gmail.com), the major author of this study. 

Key words – Harappan Civilization, Burial sites, Human skeletal remains, Diet, Genetics
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Studies on Ancient Parasite DNA from Archeologically Obtained Human Coprolites 

Chang Seok Oh, Min Seo, and Dong Hoon Shin

1Department of Anatomy, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-Dong, Chongno-Gu, Seoul 110-799, Republic of Korea
2Anthropology and Paleopathology Lab, Institute of Forensic Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-Dong, Chongno-Gu, Seoul 110-799, Republic of Korea
3Department of Parasitology, Dankook University College of Medicine, San 29, Anseo-Dong, Chonan 330-714, Republic of Korea

For the past several years, our paleoparasitological studies showed successfully that ancient parasite eggs could be detected from archaeologically obtained human coprolites. PCR-based aDNA analysis further revealed invaluable genetic information on the ancient parasite species. Actually, we were successful in extracting and sequencing Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, Clonorchis sinensis, and Paragonimus westermani aDNA. Although our studies served to confirm the academic significance of combining PCR-based molecular data with microscopic findings on ancient parasite eggs, we also admit that such analysis will have to be extended into much deeper levels of inquiry and details like bioinformatics. By such studies focusing on phylogenetics of ancient parasites over wider geographical and temporal ranges, we can broaden our knowledge about genetic history of specific parasite species. Any queries about our studies may be sent to Chang Seok Oh (oxman@snu.ac.kr) or Dong Hoon Shin (drdoogi@snu.ac.kr). This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2013R1A1A2009688).
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Ancient Megalithic Culture in Vidarbha Region of Central India

Dong Hoon Shin, Kantikumar A. Pawar, Yongjun Kim,

Deccan College Post Graduate and Research Institute, Pune, India-06
Institute of Forensic Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea

In India, the megalith tradition is associated with Early Iron Age culture mainly found in the Central and Southern parts of the subcontinent. Actually, as the megalithic culture was not only confined to Indian subcontinent, but it is also shared by the other Asian countries, there have been heated debates about whether such a cultural similarity was caused by direct people migration or simple cultural influences between them. In this study, to provide the academic clues for thought, we try to introduce the dolmens and associated material culture in Vidarbha region of India, one of the most unique in ancient architectural features of the country. By this presentation, we show that interdisciplinary collaboration between archaeological, historical and scientific researches might become very significant in forthcoming days, for a complete understanding of cultural interactions and/or people migration between the megalith cultures in different Asian countries. Queries about this poster might be sent to the major author, K. Pawar(kantipawar@gmail.com).

Keywords: migration, cultural influence, megaliths, Hirapur, dolmens

Comments

  1. The modified abstract sends a more stronger message! :) .

    ReplyDelete
  2. What was discussed in the poster presentation on rakhi garhi skeletons

    ReplyDelete

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