Sunday, August 21, 2016

New Article in Popular Magazine for Korean Archaeologists

My article about Paleoparasitology is published in popular archaeology magazine "Unearth" in S Korea.

As the information about the studies on ancient parasitism has been very rare among archaeologists in S Korea, I hope to write about the introduction to paleoparasitology, being used as a stepping stone to much in-depth studies of this field. 

Thursday, August 18, 2016

World Archaeology Congress Session T10-O "Paleopathology in Asia"



Aug 30, 2016
14:20-18:40 PM
Doshisha University, Kyoto

Organizers:
  
Hisashi Fujita (Niigata College of Nursing)
Dong Hoon Shin (Seoul National University)


Sub-session 1: Current topics of bioarchaeology
Helen Cho et al. Mandibular and palatine tori in Joseon dynasty skeletal remains
Chang Seok Oh et al. Studies on Ancient Parasite DNA from Archeologically Obtained Human Coprolites
Yumiko Oyabu Paleopathological research of traumas of human skeletal remains of Doigahama site, Yayoi period in Japan.
Shiori Yonemoto Musculoskeletal Stress Markers (MSMs) in Jomon Hunter-gatherers and Yayoi Agriculturalists in Japan: Interregional variations in subsistence strategy and in division of labor based on sex.
Lanka Ranaweera and Gamini Adikari. Talking fossils: pathological evidences in human skeletal remains from Sri Lanka

Sub-session 2: Paleopathology today 
Eun Jin Woo et al. Paleopathological Study of a Probable Case of Leprosy in a Joseon Dynasty (South Korean) Population
Shiori Fujisawa et al. Bone lesions found on human skeletal remains excavated from early-modern Japanese archeological sites - with a focus on syphilis and leprosy
Hyejin Lee et al. Radiological Techniques for an Effective Paleopathological Studies in South Korea
Aiko Saso and Osamu Kondo. Changing patterns of oral health condition according to gender and age in the Neolithic Jomon populations in Japan. 
Hirotaka Tomita A comparison of the oral health between urban and non-urban residents in the Early Modern era of Northern Kyushu, Japan
Hisashi Fujita Reconstruction of both the paleo-enviroment and paleo-health from human skeletal remains from the QAU site in Egypt

POSTER Session:

Astha Dibyopama, Dong Hoon Shin, Vasant Shinde, and Nilesh P. Jadhav. Harappan Burial Sites in India: Recent Research Trends
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Abstracts

[Podium] Studies on Ancient Parasite DNA from Archeologically Obtained Human Coprolites 

Chang Seok Oh1,2, Min Seo3, and Dong Hoon Shin1,2

1Department of Anatomy, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-Dong, Chongno-Gu, Seoul 110-799, Republic of Korea
2Anthropology and Paleopathology Lab, Institute of Forensic Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-Dong, Chongno-Gu, Seoul 110-799, Republic of Korea
3Department of Parasitology, Dankook University College of Medicine, San 29, Anseo-Dong, Chonan 330-714, Republic of Korea

For the past several years, our paleoparasitological studies showed that ancient parasite eggs could be detected from ancient human coprolites. Using the samples, PCR-based aDNA analysis further revealed invaluable genetic information on the ancient parasite species. Actually, we were successful in extracting and sequencing aDNA of Trichuris, Ascaris, Clonorchis, and Paragonimus spp. Our studies confirmed the academic significance of combining PCR-based molecular biology with microscopic findings from ancient parasite eggs, being extended into much higher level of inquiry using bioinformatics. By such studies focusing on the phylogenetics over broader geographical and temporal ranges, we can show the genetic history of parasite species much successfully than ever. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2013R1A1A2009688).

Keywords: Parasite; Paleoparasitology, Ascaris, Trichuris, Clonorchis, Paragonimus, phylogenetics

[Podium] Radiological Techniques for an Effective Paleopathological Studies in South Korea

Hyejin Leea,b, Dong Su Yooc, Chang Seok Oha, Jong Ha Honga, Dong Hoon Shina

aBioanthropology and Paleopathology Lab, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea
bMinistry of National Defense Agency KIA Recovery & Identification, Seoul, South Korea
cDepartment of Diagnostic Radiology, Dankook University College of Medicine, Chonan, South Korea

Over the past several years, to obtain the clues for more comprehensive understanding of the biological aspects of pre-modern Korean people in history, radiological technique has been applied to the ancient human remains obtained from the archaeological sites in the country. In fact, though radiology becomes well-established technique for a correct diagnosis of pathological signs still remained in ancient human samples, it has not been proved authentic even by for now, due to insufficient data accumulated for the correct interpretation of the results. To overcome this technical limitation, the radiological data of the pre-modern human samples from South Korea have been analyzed herewith, showing invaluable information that could be used helpfully for improving the accuracy of our future X-ray or CT readings on them. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2013R1A1A2009688).

[Poster] Harappan Burial Sites in India: Recent Research Trends

Dong Hoon Shin1, Astha Dibyopama2, Vasant Shinde2, and Nilesh P. Jadhav2

1Institute of Forensic Science, Seoul National University, Korea
2Department of Archaeology, Deccan College Post Graduate and Research Institute, India

Harappan civilization flourished mainly in northwestern province of Indian subcontinent, roughly between 4000 to 1500 BCE. There are about more than fifty burial sites of the Harappa Civilization discovered so far. Among them, Lothal, Kalibangan, Rupar, Rakhigarhi, Farmana etc. are major sites yielding the remains of Harappan burial. Until the early 1980’s, the study of human skeletons was primarily focused to answer specific questions pertaining to establishing the ethnic or racial identity of the concerned population. Recently, however, more efforts are made to study the diet, health and DNA of Harappan population, assuming a new aspect of research trends on this. The aim of present paper is to show how the scientific methods applied to Harappan burials are used for the complete reconstruction of Harappan civilization and its people. Queries about this poster might be sent to the major author, A. Dibyopama(astha2sep@gmail.com).

Key words – Harappan Civilization, Burial sites, Human skeletal remains, Diet, Genetics

[OTHER POSTERS] We also joined 

T10-45P / Astha Dibyopama / Harappan Burial Sites in India: Recent Research Trends
T11-02P / Elora Tribedy / Buddhist Landscape and Its Aftermath: A Case Study on Odisha, India
T09-03P / Avradeep Munshi / Forts and Mason Marks: A case study of Champaner – Pavagadh Archaeological Park ; Gujarat
T05-06P / Kanti Pawar / Existence of Megalithic Dolmen in Central India and their Cultural Comparison with Other Asian Countries